Advisory Board

SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

Roger Pomerantz, M.D.
Chairman

 

Dr. Pomerantz is currently President, Chief Executive Officer, and Chairman of the Board of Directors of Seres Therapeutics, Inc. He was formerly Worldwide Head of Licensing & Acquisitions, Senior Vice President at Merck & Co., Inc. where he oversaw all licensing and acquisitions at Merck Research Laboratories. Previously, he served as Senior Vice President and Global Franchise Head of Infectious Diseases at Merck. Prior to joining Merck, Roger was Global Head of Infectious Diseases for Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceuticals, responsible for all anti-infective agents worldwide. He has been responsible for leading the development of eight approved drugs for HIV, HCV and MDR-TB. He received his B.A. in Biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins University and his M.D. at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. His post-doctoral research training in molecular retrovirology was obtained at both Harvard Medical School and the Whitehead Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in the laboratory of Nobel Laureate Dr. David Baltimore. Dr. Pomerantz also served as the Chief Resident at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Harry Greenberg, M.D.

 

Dr. Greenberg is currently the Joseph D. Grant Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology and the Senior Associate Dean for Research and Training at Stanford University School of Medicine. He was formerly Sr. Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer at Aviron. He is a virologist and a world leader in enteric diseases, as well as one of the inventors of Bovine Rotavirus Vaccine™. An expert in vaccine safety and efficacy, he serves as a member of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and as chairman of the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC). He has published more than 350 scientific papers, served on the editorial boards of numerous journals and is currently an editor of the Journal of Virology. Dr. Greenberg is a member or fellow of a variety of scholarly societies, including the ASCI, AAP, ASV and the AAAS. Dr. Greenberg received his M.D. from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1970.

Steven Opal, M.D.

 

Dr. Opal served as chief of the infectious disease division at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island and has served as the principal investigator for numerous, worldwide, multi-center trials of adjuvant agents for severe sepsis. He has also served on numerous data safety monitoring boards is an internationally recognized key opinion leader in sepsis and pneumonia. Dr. Opal has written more than 150 peer-reviewed research articles and has edited several academic research journals, as well as three textbooks on infectious diseases, endotoxin-mediated diseases and septic shock.

John S. Patton, Ph.D.

 

Dr. Patton was Co-Founder and served as the former Chief Scientific Officer of Nektar Therapeutics (formerly Inhale Therapeutic Systems). A renowned expert in the pulmonary delivery of peptides and proteins, Dr. Patton led the drug delivery group at Genentech, where he demonstrated the feasibility of systemic delivery of large molecules through the lungs. Prior to joining Genentech, Dr. Patton was a tenured professor at the University of Georgia. He received his Ph.D. in biology from the University of California, San Diego, and held post-doctoral positions in biomedicine at Harvard Medical School and the University of Lund in Sweden.

Jerry Pier, Ph.D.

 

Dr. Pier is Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. He is a molecular microbiologist and a recognized expert on Pseudomonas and Staphylococci and is the inventor of human anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa monoclonal antibodies (Aerucin™) and a number of vaccines and antibody therapeutics against Pseudomonas and Staphylococci. He has published more than 150 publications on pathogen host interactions, bacterial virulence factors, cystic fibrosis and treatment for Pseudomonas infections. Dr. Pier is also the senior editor of the immunology textbook Immunology, Infection and Immunity.

Arnold Smith, M.D.

 

Dr. Smith is Professor of Pediatrics in the Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington and a Member of the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute. He spent more than 15 years developing better antibiotic treatment for children with cystic fibrosis at Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center in Seattle. Dr. Smith performed the first clinical trials demonstrating efficacy of inhaled tobramycin against CF lung infections. A pediatric infectious disease expert, Dr. Smith spent the first two decades of his academic career at Harvard Medical School and then at University of Missouri School of Medicine as part of teams that developed a vaccine to prevent life-threatening Haemophilus influenzae infections. He has published more than 200 papers and has written or reviewed more than 70 book chapters. He was Professor and Chair, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at University of Missouri Medical School and Acting Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases of the Children’s Hospital Medical Center at Harvard Medical School.

CLINICAL ADVISORY BOARD

Jean Chastre, M.D.

 

Dr. Chastre, Consulting Professor in the Medical ICU and former director of the same ICU at Institut de Cardiologie, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière in Paris, France, also served as a member of the Clinical Advisory Board at Kenta Biotech AG (formerly Kenta Biotech Ltd.). He is a recognized expert in the performance of clinical outcomes research in the ICU setting and his clinical research focus has been the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of nosocomial infections and the improved care of mechanically ventilated patients. He is also a professor of medicine at Paris 6 University School of Medicine, Faculté de Médecine Pitié-Salpêtrière, France, and has published more than 170 peer-reviewed papers and authored or co-authored 18 book chapters. He earned his fellowship in cardiology and critical care and is licensed and board certified in cardiology with a subspecialty in critical care.

Marin Kollef, M.D.

 

Dr. Kollef is the director of the medical intensive care unit and respiratory care services at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri. He is also a professor of medicine at Washington University, School of Medicine, and has lectured on numerous critical care topics such as fungal infection, VAP, antibiotic resistance and antibiotic therapy optimization. He serves on the editorial boards of numerous medical journals, such as Respiratory Care, Critical Care and Journal of Surgical Infections. He is the recipient of various honors and awards, including selection to “Best Doctors in America,” central region and Barnes-Jewish Hospital team awards for quality improvement for programs directed to VAP prevention, bloodstream infection prevention and the “Surviving Sepsis Initiative.” His awards for military service with the First Infantry Division during operation Desert Storm include Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal and Combat Medical Badge in support of combat operations. He is also a member of multiple organizations in his field and chair for the Global Anti-Infectives Leadership Academy.

Bruno Francois, M.D.

 

Dr. Francois, a specialist in intensive care medicine and anesthesiology, heads the Limoges Clinical Investigation Center with a specific focus on infectious diseases in critically ill patients at the University Hospital of Limoges, France. He has participated in several advisory boards for Sepsis and VAP multinational trials, independent clinical evaluation committees and adjudication committees. He is also the author of multiple publications and a reviewer for medical journals focused on infectious disease in the ICU. He is currently investigating the role of bacterial resistance mechanisms and integrons during Sepsis with the Marie-Cécile Ploy Inserm research team from Limoges, France. He created the CRICS network dedicated to clinical research in Sepsis trials in 2007 and is now co-leading the French TRIGGERSEP research network (F-CRIN certification within ECRIN), which integrates all research activities in Sepsis from basic science to clinical trials. He is also coordinating the COMBACTE consortium within the IMI framework and leading the SAATELLITE trial in collaboration with Medimmune since 2012.

Michael Niederman, M.D.

 

A practicing pulmonologist for 30 years and a leading expert in hospital-acquired pneumonia, Dr. Niederman serves as Professor and Clinical Director of Pulmonary and Critical Care at the New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medical Center. Previously, he served as Professor of Medicine and Vice Chairman of the Department of Medicine at the SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine and as Chair of the Department of Medicine at Winthrop-University Hospital. He has published more than 350 peer-reviewed or review articles and book chapters, is co-editor of the first and second editions of the textbook, Respiratory Infections: A Scientific Basis for Management and is editor-in-chief of Clinical Pulmonary Medicine. He obtained his degree from Boston University School of Medicine, performed residency at Northwestern University Medical School and his fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care at Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Niederman is a Fellow and active member of The American College of Chest Physicians, The American College of Physicians and The American Thoracic Society.